How Trump and E. L. James Cured My Anxiety

For whatever reason, I actually felt less and less nervous about publishing my first novella the closer the release date came. Here’s an inside look into what transpired in the days leading up to the release of Show Her.



What I Expected To Happen

Given the near-nervous-breakdown I had when I published the first version of Show Her many, many moons ago, I kinda figured it would go the same way this time. I would be making an insane amount of changes up until the very last second and then would click ‘Publish’ with my eyes closed and go curl into the fetal position on my bed feeling like I’d just murdered a herd of puppies with a blunt axe.

In short, I didn’t think that I had really gathered any confidence at all since the last time I tried to do this. I thought it would be a cluster-fuck of epic proportions.

 

 

What I Didn’t Expect To Happen

Yet, it didn’t go like that. Don’t get me wrong, I am a procrastination master (though I am trying to become a better person in this regard), so I was still making major changes to the plot, character descriptions, and even the entire ending as of a week before the launch.

However, I found myself getting more and more excited about release day coming as it approached. I found myself actually telling family members, co-workers, and even strangers early on, with ease and relative comfort.

 

 

 

Why It Happened This Way (In My Humble Opinion)

There are a couple of major things that happened since I began thinking that I wanted to make writing my full-time career that contributed to this more relaxed reaction to self-publishing. Please feel free to use this information for your personal healing if that’s helpful for you.

First, Donald Trump got elected as President of the United States of America. I’ve never been so glued to an election in my life (okay, 2008, I guess, but you know what I mean). So, why was Donald Trump an inspiration that eased my anxiety? Because–following the “rules” of politics–he shouldn’t have won. He should have lost. He should have been an epic failure, a laughing stock. He should have been rejected by every single voter in the country according to traditional political ideology because he “didn’t fit in.” He didn’t look, think, act, walk, or talk like a president or even your run-of-the-mill politician. Yet, he won it all, and by a landslide.

If this man that stood “no chance” of winning the day he announced that he was running made it all the way to the top through sheer persistence and giving haters and critiques the bird, who was I to feel inadequate? How dare I be afraid of rejection! If he can make it to the top of Mount Everest from the Earth’s core, certainly I can make it from the bottom of the mountain (geez, at least I’m above sea level).

Second, E. L. James’ Fifty Shades of Grey not only became a bestseller, but went on to become a proverbial movement in the literary and cinema worlds.  I just had to read it since it was getting so much hype, but when I tried, it was like trying not to pass out while sawing off my own leg.

Why is this inspirational for me? Because I struggled so hard to get through the book. I’ve never been a huge fan of romance novels (though I do enjoy erotica) so that was already a strike against her. Beyond that, I personally thought the book wasn’t well written and the plot was not realistic or thought through very much. It was like she wrote it and sent it in without any rereading it herself, having a friend look at, hiring a copy editor or proofreader, etc.–straight from brain to print.

And yet, look at the enterprise that has been built from it! So, again, what the fuck would be wrong with me to think that I can’t be successful just because I don’t love the things that I write? What kind of sense does it make for me to doubt myself and the reading public? If she can do what she loves successfully, so can I.

As an added bonus, I have my beautiful and talented Curtis Cartel as backup. Forming my own cartel was something I knew that I needed to do in order to keep myself moving forward with publishing and hold myself to deadlines. But I could not have imagined how invaluable they have been in helping me turn Show Her into a solid piece of literature.

 

 

If you find yourself doubting your work or your abilities, just remember that there are people out there making hundreds of thousands and even millions of dollars who don’t write half as well as you do, who don’t have the same education and experiences that you have, and who don’t have the same world view as you do. Just because you are technically different from these people doesn’t mean that you can’t succeed at the things that they do. Good luck!

 

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Mature Bookworms Only: ‘Show Her’ Opening Chapter

It’s brought some to tears and made others nauseous. You’ve been warned. This is the opening chapter of ‘Show Her’. If you want to order it now for delivery after April 1st, just go to volo-press.com/show-her or order at the end of this post. Thanks!


Everyone knows you can’t force a man to come back if he doesn’t want to. But coercion, enticement, and allure can work wonders.

 

Of course, none of this was Erika’s intent. She was an eleven-year-old girl still silently reeling over the departure of her father for a younger, prettier version of her vessel—the woman who gave birth to, and raised, her and her younger sister, Elena.

 

About two days after the packed bags, begging, and arguing, Erika was sitting on the front porch with her sister. She attempted play, pushed to feign joy, but she couldn’t get Elena out of her funk. But Erika was old enough to understand that once he was gone, he was gone. There was nothing else to be done. So why wallow? Why fret? Why not get on with things?

 

Erika was using the mobile television to play one of her favorite movies about a man fighting to find his kidnapped son. Erika laid back on the black silk, goose down quilt, on top of a day bed, her sister beside her. A drone the size of a dollar bill projected the film onto the ceiling. Erika commanded the drone to turn up the volume as the sound of their vessel in the kitchen chopping shallots became increasingly distracting.

 

Erika giggled and squeezed her sister as the puppy that opened the movie came on screen. Erika made sure Elena noticed her being okay, laughing, enjoying spending time with them. Erika wanted her happiness to be contagious. Somehow, then, it would be real.

 

She felt Elena’s sniffling slow and her whining calm. Elena’s face inched away from Erika’s hairless armpit and towards the ceiling as the boy found the puppy and decided to bring it home in an attempt to keep it as his own. The meek laughter that sounded from her sister when the boy had to stop at some park sprinklers to try to get some of the puppy urine off of his shirt comforted Erika.

 

Erika could feel the tension in her sister’s body easing away as the film went on, only to return with a vengeance when the boy finally got home and confronted his father about the puppy.

 

Even though the father was kind, thoughtful, honest, and pleasant in his interaction with his son, her sister couldn’t stand to be reminded of what they’d lost. She began crying again. Erika felt her frustration rising and left her in the day bed to rot in her sadness.

 

“You big baby!” She yelled at the melancholy strain surrounding the house.

 

Erika went back into the house and upstairs, passing pictures of herself and her sister at even younger ages. An eight-foot-tall portrait of her father was painted directly onto the slate wall at the top of the stairs, dominating the hallway. Erika paused to glare at the portrait with clenched fists. Her father was by all accounts a handsome man. Hair always freshly twisted, neat. His face, in the portrait, carried a light that only creative license could inject. In person, her father rarely smiled or laughed. Not that he seemed depressed or particularly sad, simply…uninterested. The portrait showed him in a tailored midnight blue suit, the color complementing his café au lait skin. His hazel eyes were not (maybe could not be) painted to show the intense judgment and power that emanated from the real things.

 

Erika blinked her stinging eyes and walked to the master bedroom. Before her stood a piece, ten feet long, molded into a semi-circle, glistening in the light of the crystal and white gold chandelier in the center of the room, and adorned with five mirrored panels. This was her vessel’s personal makeover studio. Erika had snuck peeks at her vessel making her face throughout her early childhood and the transformations she witnessed seemed nothing short of magic. Years fell away, fatigue disappeared, anger softened into angelic peacefulness.

 

As she grew older—as was her vessel’s duty—Erika got lessons from her on how to dress, speak, and craft her face to entice, seduce, and maintain the attention of a potential master. Erika was fascinated about the fact that she could create happiness and tranquility with dusts, creams, and stains.

 

She stepped up to the center of the bow of koa wood trimmed with ebony, allowed her eyes to glide over the various boxes, baskets, cups, and trays of oils, powders, fragrances, conditioners, and paints.

 

In her peripheral vision she saw a sparkle. Looking up at the last mirror on the right, she saw her father’s watch hanging on the corner of the frame. With hands and digits made entirely of black diamonds, the watch had been his most prized possession. This was the utmost confirmation that he would never return. If he had left something so important to him behind for so long, he meant to stay away.

 

Erika pulled on one of the crystal knobs on the top drawer and withdrew some of the brushes and pencils. She used cleanser pads to clear her skin, allowing it to dry before she got to work changing her face. When she finished, she pulled a short, pleated, black skirt and long-sleeved, gunmetal blouse from the closet and put them on.

 

She was surprised that she had developed enough at eleven that the skirt stayed up and the blouse didn’t hang off of her, but hugged her swelling chest. She pressed a button below the center mirror and it moved forward and tilted down so that she could see her entire body and not just her head and torso.

 

This was the first time she saw herself in her own styling. The first time she realized that, as she grew older, finding someone willing to purchase her was going to be the least of her worries. The thickness of her thighs and flare of her hips told the story of a body that would draw masters for miles. She would have her pick. A tiny, mournful smile touched her lips as she observed herself. Erika, the grown up.

 

After a few more seconds of twisting, turning, and modeling for herself in the mirror, she had worked up some laughter. Heartfelt laughter, not the kind she used to try to coax her sister and her vessel into being happy again. She released her notions of a lady’s proper behavior and let the mirth tumble freely, raucously from her throat. Short of breath, she finally walked back up to the dresser and used the control panel to put the center mirror back in place.

 

As she reached for makeup remover, she felt a presence behind her and realized that her father had entered the room. He must have snuck in through the rear door since her sister wasn’t trailing him and her vessel had not screamed curses.

 

For a moment, Erika was overwhelmed with happiness. She thought her hopes had been realized and that he had seen the error of his ways and returned to the family. He had come to make peace.

 

But the way he was looking at her in the mirror disturbed her more than usual. His normally cold demeanor was mixed with something electric. Dangerous even. He looked at Erika from head to toe from behind and at her reflection in the mirror.

 

“Those are your vessel’s things you have on.” His voice was deep and monotone, as though he were bored. Erika now knew, based on his body language and the words he chose to speak at that moment, that he was preparing to discipline her for using her vessel’s things without permission. Tears burned her sinuses again as she realized he had probably only come back for the watch.

“I’m sorry, Daddy. I didn’t mean any harm. Please don’t hit me. I’m taking it off.” Erika tried her best to hold back her tears as she reached for the makeup remover, hoping to move quickly enough that he would let her go without punishment. But he was faster.

 

Erika’s father took two quick, long strides and was by her side, grabbing her wrist. He force her hand down onto the dresser and signaled for her to put her other hand on the dresser as well. Crying had always made her beatings worse—her father noting that she was trying to manipulate him and therefore deserved more punishment—but she couldn’t hold the tears back any more, especially as he grabbed the watch off of the mirror and put it on his wrist.

 

Erika understood that this may be one of the last times she ever saw her father as he goes on to live a new life with his cuter, more youthful, childless purchase. She hated that this was how she was going to spend this time—being hit, feeling sorry, having made her father angry. Erika felt worthless and ashamed.

 

Erika’s father stood behind her and pulled down her skirt and panties and then she heard him taking off his belt. She made fists with her hands, but kept them on the dresser, per protocol. She braced herself for the lashes to come, letting her tears flow freely, but silently.

 

The first lash came like a wave of anguish that spread across her skin. The pain only intensified strike after strike, as though the belt were sprouting spikes and flames the longer it was wielded.

 

Finally, after Erika was certain she wouldn’t be able to sit for the rest of the day, and her father was breathless behind her, the hits here, just like she hoped for. He’s here…he’s here…he’s here…

 

Erika could see her father in the mirror when she looked up and he was smiling, lost in an ecstasy that didn’t match her experience at all. This was the most expressive she had ever seen his face. His moaning and gasping was like a beautiful, new language he was speaking to her. In the midst of her violation, she was shown a power that she didn’t realize that she had.

 

She kept her eyes on the reflection of his in the mirror until he finished with her.

 


Like what you read? Be sure to leave a comment! Thanks for reading!

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Character Development: Children’s Roles: Mascot

Creating a Mascot for your fiction can help make a particular character seem more realistic in the eyes of your readers.

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What are Children’s Roles?

Children’s roles are a specific set of coping mechanisms that children tend to develop throughout chaotic situations in their childhood. This could include the loss of a parent, a family struggle with addiction, or even a move to a new place.

The four major roles are Family Hero, Scapegoat, Lost Child, and Mascot. Most children have played these roles at various points throughout their lives, but some kids get “stuck” in one of these roles and it can be problematic for them as they grow older. However, while they are in the midst of the chaos (parent loses a job, being severely bullied at school, parents divorce, etc.), these behaviors are how they cope with the pain.

What’s a Mascot Like?

A Mascot is often referred to as ‘cute,’ ‘playful,’ ‘funny,’ or a ‘jokester.’ You may have seen, heard of, been friend with, or even been a Mascot yourself. For the last time, let’s use our example of a single, alcoholic mother. After losing her job due to her consistent drunkenness, she decides to drown her sorrows in yet more alcohol. As noted in previous posts, this means that bills are not being paid, clothes are not being washed, groceries are not being purchased, and so on. Te household containing her and her 4 children is in chaos. While the Family Hero is filling in as a pseudo-parent, the Scapegoat is doing the exact opposite. The Lost Child is finding ways to get their needs met while drawing as little attention to themselves as possible and interacting with others physically as little as possible. The Mascot may find ways to distract from the pain being felt by the family.

The Mascot often has a knack for easing tension with their looks or by invoking laughter (you may even see dome puppies respond to tension in this way). When the mother and the Scapegoat look like they’re about to get into a fight, the Mascot might come to show off a picture they drew, a new outfit, their face after trying to put on makeup, or a new joke they just heard. They may see the Family Hero as a wearing themselves thin to cover for the absentee parent, the Scapegoat as someone who makes tension and chaos worse instead of better, and the Lost Child as a neutral being just trying to stay upright on a wildly swaying ship.

Human beings are some of the most social animals on the planet. We crave human contact and attention from birth. The Family Hero gets their attention from their peers and the accolades they get from others who see them “doing so well.” The Scapegoat gets their attention from getting into trouble or joining a gang. The Lost Child seeks only to be left alone. The Mascot wants everybody to be happy, or at least appear that way, so they find solace and power in being able to draw attention away from the problems of the family, even if only for a little while.

Pretending not to understand when things get “too serious” may lead a family to shy away from sharing very much with the Mascot because they aren’t seen as being able to comprehend the seriousness of the situation. This child makes it easier to bear being part of such a painful family situation.

Mascots as Adults

If the single, alcoholic mother of four goes to treatment for her addiction and gets some treatment for her children, they may be able to wrench themselves loose from these roles. However, if this doesn’t happen, it’s very easy for a child’s personality/sense of self and their role in this chaotic situation to become enmeshed.

When this happens, the Mascot becomes an adult who finds ways to ease the discomfort of others in showy and superficial ways. This person may often be called a ‘class clown,’ or be said to ‘think everything is a joke.’ They may live in boarding situations in order to always have an “audience” so to speak.

The most comfortable employment situations for Mascots would be professions such as a stand-up comedian, fashion model, actor / actress, stripper, or prostitute. For Mascots who used their looks to ease tension as children, it is not uncommon to find out that they were molested by their parent or other close adults in their lives.

 

Mascots / Class Clowns in Fiction

A Mascot character will often be one who uses sex to get what they want out of relationships with others. They may be loved by someone else because they make them laugh and don’t take anything very seriously.

Until they begin an entertainment career of their own, they may work in other professions that allow them to interact with people on a consistent basis. This might include being a delivery driver, working as a server at a restaurant, or even being an actual clown for kids birthday parties. They could also work as boyfriends or girlfriend for rent, commercial models, or music video dancers (“video vixens”).

Having a Mascot character with a realistic backstory can add depth to your piece and possibly offer some extra paths for you to explore when it comes to how your character will behave in new situations they run into in your story.

Stay gready, Friends!

 

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Character Development: Children’s Roles: Lost Child

Creating a Lost Child for your story can help make a character more realistic in the eyes of the reader.

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What are Children’s Roles?

Children’s roles are a specific set of coping mechanisms that children tend to develop throughout chaotic situations in their childhood. This could include the loss of a parent, a family struggle with addiction, or even a move to a new place.

The four major roles are Family Hero, Scapegoat, Lost Child, and Mascot. Most children have played these roles at various points throughout their lives, but some kids get “stuck” in one of these roles and it can be problematic for them as they grow older. However, while they are in the midst of the chaos (parent loses a job, being severely bullied at school, parents divorce, etc.), these behaviors are how they cope with the pain.

What’s a Lost Child Like?

A Lost Child is often referred to as ‘the quiet one,’ ‘wallflower’, or ‘independent.’ You may have seen, heard of, been friends with, or even been a Lost Child yourself. Let’s use the example of a single, alcoholic mother once again. She loses her job due to her consistent drunkenness and decides to drown her sorrows in yet more alcohol. As noted in previous posts, this means that bills are not being paid, clothes are not being washed, groceries are not being purchased, and so on. The household containing her and her 4 children is in chaos. While the Family Hero is filling in as a pseudo-parent, the Scapegoat is doing the exact opposite, and the Lost Child is finding ways to get their needs met while drawing as little attention to themselves as possible.

The Lost Child may spend most of their day doing something that helps this disconnect from reality including reading (me), playing video games (me again), writing (once again, me), or browsing the internet (yep, me). This child wants to distance themselves from the painful living conditions that their family provides. They may see the Family Hero as working too hard, see the Scapegoat as getting too much negative attention, and just wants to blend into the background so that they can be left alone.

Human beings are some of the most social animals on the planet. We crave human contact and attention from birth. The Family Hero gets their attention from their peers and the accolades they get from others who see them “doing so well.” The Scapegoat gets their attention from getting into trouble or joining a gang. However, the Lost Child does not seek attention. Where a Family Hero strives for As and a Scapegoat may flunk out of school completely, a Lost Child wants to do well enough that they don’t get in trouble for getting horrible grades, but don’t get singled out for having great grades. This child strives to do work that is passing and nothing more.

The Lost Child may be left behind on a family vacation or have their names routinely forgotten by people the go to school with (including teachers). Being consistently quietly busy by themselves, these children are often seen as “low maintenance.” If mom is passed out on the couch and the Family Hero went downtown to bail the Scapegoat out of jail, the Lost Child would simply forge a signature on the permission they need for tomorrow, make themselves a sandwich, grab a soda out of the fridge, and spend the remainder of the night in their room watching television after completing their homework with careful mediocrity.

This child makes it easy to forget that there is another responsibility in the house that is not being met by the mother. This child offers relief to the chaos of the family situation because they don’t add any extra stress. The mother in this scenario does not have to be concerned at all about the Lost child.

While many parents used to attempting to manage multiple, rambunctious children may see the Lost Child as a blessing, these children are commonly deeply troubled. Many of the young people who have been notorious for committing mass shootings at schools would be considered a Lost Child.

Habitually pulling away from in-person relationships means that they can develop a warped expectation of control in relationships. In the virtual world, if someone posts a video they don’t like or writes something negative about them, they can not watch the video again, go to another site, or even shut down the computer or smart phone completely. This means that they find safety and normalcy in removing themselves from interactions with other humans beings in the simplest ways possible. Sometimes severe bullying or exclusion can lead to them believing that death (of themselves, their peers, or both) is the most efficient end to the strife caused by being in any kind of relationship with someone who is hurting them in some way.

Less drastically, this child may never learn how to develop healthy coping, communication, and other interpersonal skills so that they can maintain friendships or even date. Until they are offered skills training, therapy, or even just a self-help book, they may never be able to heal and begin to have healthy views of themselves, other people, and human relationships in general.

Lost Children as Adults

If the single, alcoholic mother of four goes to treatment for her addiction and gets some treatment for her children, they may be able to wrench themselves loose from these roles. However, if this doesn’t happen, it’s very easy for a child’s personality/sense of self and their role in this chaotic situation to become enmeshed.

When this happens, the Lost Child becomes an adult who searches for ways to get their needs met while keeping human interaction as low as possible. This person is often called ‘quiet’ or ‘shy’ and accused of having ‘no personality’ or being ‘boring.’ Because they equate human relationships with pain, they are likely to live alone (maybe with their original family under certain circumstances).

The notion of finding gainful employment may seem daunting, but they will try to find a way to do “background” work (such as working backstage at a theater, working behind the scenes of a television show, being a grocery stock member, being an office building janitor, etc.) or solo work (writing, video transcription, copy editing, etc.).

Starting a family is often the furthest thing from this person’s mind because they don’t want to risk falling into the type of chaos that the experienced as a child. They are likely to masturbate regularly as opposed to attempting to find a consenting sexual partner. They may pay for sex as well, but this may be relatively rare since it involves another human being.

 

Lost Children / Wallflowers in Fiction

This character is often the one who has no idea that someone is attracted to them and would run scared if they knew anyway. Someone trying to show / teach them that not all human interaction is painful might make for a good romance or romantic portion of a story.

This character would be much more likely to rely on WebMD and YouTube videos for any minor or moderate medical conditions.

Because they like to work solo or in the background, they will rarely (if ever) be a celebrity of any kind. They will stay on top of their finances just enough to not get called by bill collectors, but not enough to get solicited by American Express. If they did fall on hard times for some reason, they would likely do without various things (even food) or go to a formal financial institution before they would think to attempt relying on someone close to them to help them out with a loan.

This character is likely to be highly socially awkward and visibly uncomfortable in group settings (sweating, eyes glued to the floor, never putting their phone down, etc.).

Having a Lost Child character with a realistic backstory can add depth to your piece and possibly offer some extra paths for your to explore with it comes to how your character will behave in new situations they run into in your story.

Stay gready, Friends!

 

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Free Reader’s Oil Trio Giveaway

Who doesn’t love free stuff?!

 

 

This is a FREE VIRTUAL event. Click here to submit entries: http://gvwy.io/3okfwpe Remember to click the check box in the bottom corner of the form after you complete a task (it will say ‘I visited!’ ‘I followed’ etc.). 
Winner will be announced on Friday!
 
–THE PRIZE–
 
A Reader’s Oil trio from Volo Press featuring three pleasant scents: Fruits Basket, Gatsby, and The Raven. This package is worth more than $15.
 
–WHAT ARE READER’S OILS?–
 
Reader’s Oils use a combination of grapeseed oil, apricot kernal oil, and fragrance to provide great-smelling, long-lasting, powerful moisture for your hands that doesn’t leave the pages of your novels, text books, or other documents covered in greasy fingerprints!
 
Reader’s Oils are convenient to have in a backpack, purse, briefcase, desk drawer, or car. Anyone who handles paper regularly is at risk for getting dry, cracked, itchy, irritated skin. This includes executives, editors, mail room clerks, receiptionists, printing press workers, bookworms, college students, and others.
 
Reader’s Oil is always available through Volo-Press.com.
 
–CONTEST PARAMETERS–
 
You can enter up to six times by simply completing 1, 2, or all 3 tasks: Visit the Volo Press Facebook page (worth 1 entry), follow Volo Press on Twitter (worth 2 entries), Tweet about Volo Press (worth 3 entries).
 
The tasks must be completed through the Rafflecopter form, or they won’t be counted.

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Writer’s Tax Deductions

There are many tax deductions currently available to independent contractors. Make sure you’re not missing out on any of these as a self-publishing author. __________



When you work for yourself, you are often considered an independent contractor. This means that you are responsible for managing your own tax payouts and keeping track of your own expenditures and revenue. When tax time rolls around, besides just knowing what you made and what you spent in general, take a closer look at your finances and try to find possible tax write-offs, credits, and cuts for you / your business. Here are some basic categories with examples to get you started.

Equipment and Supplies

Equipment Warranties and Insurance
Printers
Ink
Computers

Laptops, desktops, tablets, etc.

Smartphones
Notebooks
Pens
Pencils
Styluses
Reading Lamps
Book Lights
Books

To read to create content for a website, observe the craft to inform your own, or even non-fiction that helped you find writing gigs, tighten up your marketing, or learn how to promote your book more effectively.

Binders
Binder Clips
Paper
Paper Clips
Staplers
Staples
Tape Dispensers
Tape
Tables
Chairs
Desks
Cameras

For taking photos to go inside your book, creating covers for a book, for PR and marketing purposes while you’re at an event, etc.

Bookshelves
Dry Erase Boards

For organizing your plot, describing your characters, outlining your story, planning publishing, or keeping meeting dates.

Dry Erase Markers, Erasers, and Cleaning Sprays
Stamps

Postage stamps for mailing out orders, along with logo or name stamps for the company.

Envelopes
Postal Scale

 

Overhead

If you have a home office or just a small space that you rent, you may be able to get deductions for some of the following expenses.

Rent
Renter’s Insurance
Gas
Water
Electricity
Extermination Services
Signage
Furniture
Magazines

For a waiting area or for your professional development (or both).

Landline Telephone
Internet Services

 

Travel

Cars
Car Registration and Taxes
Bikes
Car Insurance
Gas
Car Maintenance and Repairs
Car Washing
Car Tires
Airplane Tickets
Hotels
Meals on the Road
Rental Car Expenses
Public Transportation Fares

Taxi, Uber, Bus, Subway, Streetcar, etc.

 

Services

Equipment or Office Repair
Marketing
Advertising
Training / Education
Cover Production
Illustration
Ghostwriting
Copy Editing
Promotional
Bookkeeping
Legal

 

Any categories or items you think are missing? Leave a comment!

 

 

 

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Meme: Summary of My Graduate School Experience

A+ every time. ^_^!

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Category: Writing | LEAVE A COMMENT